Can I Eat Boba With Braces? Quick Answer

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Can you eat boba pearls?

Everyone has their own preferences, whether they prefer to swallow… or chew, how they like to eat/drink their boba is completely up to them. However, like when consuming any other type of foods, it would certainly be far more beneficial to chew your tapioca balls.

Can I drink milk tea with braces?

The short answer to this question is no, you typically do not have to give up coffee, tea, or soup when you have braces. You do, however, need to make sure that you exercise proper care of your orthodontic appliance.

What can u not drink with braces?

Sugary Drinks to Avoid with Braces
  • Acidic liquids (includes distilled water and some bottled spring water)
  • Energy drinks.
  • Flavored water.
  • Fruit drinks.
  • Sodas (including diet)
  • Sports drinks.

Does boba cause cavities?

Woan Fei: Drinking bubble tea will not cause diabetes directly. However, its sugar content can post a high risk of not only diabetes but also low immunity, accelerated ageing and tooth decay.

Can 9 year olds drink boba tea?

But here’s something to consider: The pearls may be a choking hazard for small kids. Germany’s Federal Institute for Risk Management warns that the pearls could be aspirated—accidentally inhaled into the lungs—especially by children under four years old.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

Bubble tea shops are fun and trendy these days, especially among kids and teenagers. But a viral message can make you wonder if your kids should avoid the drink entirely.

It was recently reported that a 14-year-old Chinese teenager suffering from stomach pain and constipation had more than 100 undigested tapioca “pearls” found in her abdomen after drinking bubble tea.

If you’re new to this, bubble tea usually consists of a ball of “pearls” — black, chewy blobs of the starchy cassava root — at the bottom of a cup. Cold tea is poured over it and mixed with things like fruit, milk, chocolate and other flavors. It’s served with a wide straw so you can suck up (and chew) the pearls while you sip the tea. It comes in dozens of bright colors and fun flavors ranging from passion fruit to peanut butter, and has legions of devoted fans.

It’s not that the bubble tea “pearls” themselves are harmful. It’s very likely that the girl in the message drank large amounts of bubble tea (much more than the occasional cup) and the starchy bubbles can cause constipation. And if you’ve read of rumors that the pearls contain cancer-causing substances, be aware that the University of California, Berkeley says that’s not the case.

But here’s something to note: the beads can pose a choking hazard to small children. Germany’s Federal Institute for Risk Management warns that the beads could be aspirated — accidentally breathed into the lungs — especially by children under the age of four. Sucking up the beads through a straw increases this risk due to the added pressure.

If your (older) kids like bubble tea or want to try it, an occasional cup is fine. But keep a few things in mind. First, bubble tea may contain caffeine because it’s made from black or green tea and served in hefty portions. One source claims that a 13-ounce cup of bubble tea has 130 mg of caffeine, which isn’t much less than the same amount of coffee. (Read: Should kids be consuming caffeine?) It’s also more of a dessert than a healthy cup of tea, similar to the whipped cream concoctions at a coffee shop. Bubble tea can also be high in sugar, and it’s not uncommon for the largest size to contain more than 500 calories, about a third of what a young child needs in a day.

So when you stop by a bubble tea shop, ask for a lesser sweetness (they usually have a wide range) and the smallest size (which is usually still pretty big!). If you’re concerned about the beads, you can ask to “treat the beads lightly” or just omit them altogether.

Sally Kuzemchak, MS, RD, is a Registered Nutritionist, Educator, and mom of two who blogs at Real Mom Nutrition. She is the author of The 101 Healthiest Foods For Kids. She also collaborated with Cooking Light on the Dinnertime Survival Guide, a cookbook for busy families. You can follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. In her free time, she loads and unloads the dishwasher. Then it loads again.

How much boba is too much?

“One to two cups a day should be fine, but you shouldn’t consume anything in excess,” Dr. Kushnir advises. “If you’re drinking five or six cups a day, and you’re noticing a change in your bowels, it could be sign that you need to cut back or drink more water.”

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

You’ve probably heard the viral story of the teen who reportedly had more than 100 undigested bubble tea pearls in her stomach. Sounds scary right? Well, it might not be as scary as it seems. Doctors are not convinced that this could actually happen.

According to Asia One, the story began when a 14-year-old girl from China told her parents that she had been constipated for five days, couldn’t eat and had severe stomach pains. A CT scan showed about 100 “unusual spherical shadows” in the girl’s abdomen. Those scoops were undigested bubble tea pearls, her doctors allegedly said.

The girl claimed she only drank one bubble tea five days earlier, but her doctors said she would have had to consume much more than that to have these symptoms.

Bubble tea pearls, or boba pearls, are usually made from tapioca, a starch obtained from the roots of cassava plants. So this is where things start to not add up. Doctors here in the US who were handling the case said tapioca and other ingredients typically found in bubble tea pearls would not show up on an X-ray or CT scan. There had to be something unusual about the beads the girl was consuming for them to show up on the scan.

Vladimir Kushnir, MD, spokesman for the American Gastroenterological Association, told Health that an indigestible additive may have been in the pearls, but it’s not clear what kind of additive it would be.

For all you bubble tea fans, don’t worry, the chances of you developing constipation and pain from your tea beverage are pretty slim. dr However, Kushnir says an additive sometimes used in bubble tea pearls called guar gum can cause constipation. Guar gum is a fiber that helps hold the balls together; It also expands when it comes into contact with water. Guar gum can actually be used to treat digestive problems, but when consumed in large amounts and with too little water, it can cause constipation.

But again, you would have to drink a lot of bubble tea for it to affect your gut. “One to two cups a day should be fine, but you shouldn’t consume anything in excess,” advises Dr. Kushnir. “If you’re drinking five or six cups a day and you notice a change in your gut, it could be a sign that you need to drink less or more water.”

Can I drink boba with Invisalign?

Answer: Invisalign – Drinking Beverages Other Than Water

Ideally, when wearing your aligners, you should not drink anything other than water. There a few reasons for this. First, hot beverages might actually distort the plastic aligner material.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

Your Invisalign splints will be perfectly adjusted to your teeth. Drinks, however, sneak between your trays and your teeth. And the Invisalign aligners squeeze that drink right against your teeth. I see absolutely no problem with drinking as much clear water as you want with the trays. However, I recommend patients to quickly drink other drinks (with sugar or lemon or lime) with the trays out. When you’re done drinking, I recommend rinsing with water before replacing the trays. Even better would be to brush your teeth before replacing the splints, but I understand this is not always feasible. Many of my patients are teenagers who play a lot of sports. The riskiest Invisalign patients are those who drink Gatorade or other sugary drinks in the office with their Invisalign splints for hours every day after school. The sugary drink is pressed directly onto the tooth surface and can cause discoloration. Unfortunately, I saw that – more than I would like. For this reason, I recommend only plain water with the shells in place. Additionally, I recommend avoiding Invisalign for patients who insist on drinking those sugary drinks for hours after school. At the end of the day, as orthodontists, we want beautiful results. Straight teeth that are discolored are not pretty.

What color is best for braces?

Choose gold, dark blue, pink, orange, turquoise, green, or violet to complement darker skin tones. Choose light blue, bronze, dark purple, or subdued reds and pinks to complement lighter skin tones. Choose darker colors to make your teeth appear whiter.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

It’s summer and a great time to change up the colors of your braces, but which colors should you choose and which colors should you avoid? From colors like red and blue to green, yellow, purple or pink, the options are virtually endless and Sturbridge orthodontists have the colors you desire. There is no official style guide for braces, but these suggestions may help you narrow down your choices:

Choose gold, dark blue, pink, orange, teal, green, or purple to complement darker skin tones.

Choose light blue, bronze, deep purple, or muted reds and pinks to complement lighter skin tones.

Choose darker colors to make your teeth appear whiter.

Watch out for lighter colors that could make your teeth look more yellow.

Consider colors that complement or complement your eyes.

Think of colors that complement the color of the clothes you wear most often.

Try your school colors or the colors of your favorite sports team.

Go red, white and blue for Memorial Day and the 4th of July.

of July. Feel festive during the holidays with red and green for Christmas or blue and pink for Easter.

Glow-in-the-dark ribbons are fun for Halloween.

You should avoid these colors:

Black (may appear like your teeth are rotting or food is stuck in your teeth).

(may appear like your teeth are rotting or food is getting stuck in your teeth). White (can make your teeth appear more yellow and white gums tend to stain more easily).

(can make your teeth appear more yellow and white gums tend to stain more easily). Yellow (tends to enhance the appearance of yellow-tinted teeth).

(tends to increase the appearance of yellow-tinted teeth). Green or brown (can be mistaken for food in your teeth).

Don’t be afraid to ask about different colors of braces at every orthodontic visit. If you are unsure about shade selection, consult a Sturbridge Orthodontist for suggestions and advice. Call to schedule an appointment today for more information on how to jazz up your braces.

What can you eat with Boba?

Savory snacks:
  • #1 French Fries and Potato Wedges. The contrast between deep-fried potatoes and boba milk tea is undeniably perfect. …
  • #2 Chicken Poppers. …
  • #3 Spiced Tofu Bites. …
  • #2 Homemade Cookies. …
  • #3 Belgian Waffles. …
  • #4 Sweet Tarts. …
  • #5 Caramel Popcorn.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

By: Lauren Landry

Here are some savory and sweet snacks that will keep your customers coming back for more!

If you’ve been thinking about offering snacks alongside your boba tea beverages, you’ve come to the right place. Providing different menu items not only keeps your customers interested, but also keeps them in your store longer, making them more likely to order more.

To make sure you’re satisfying all of your customers, you need to accommodate different tastes. Some may want saltiness to contrast the sweetness of their drinks, while others have a sweet tooth and want both their drink and snack sweet. A selection of savory and sweet foods is then the best solution.

Here are five savory and five sweet snacks that are perfect to enjoy with boba tea drinks:

Savory snacks:

#1 French fries and potato wedges

The contrast between fried potatoes and boba milk tea is undeniably perfect. Customers can also dip the fries or wedges in whipped cream or ice cream on top of their boba drinks for a delicious taste-game in your mouth!

You can also offer the fries and wedges in different flavors. The most popular are sour cream, barbecue and cheese.

#2 Chicken poppers

Bite-sized chicken fillet poppers are as perfect as french fries and potato wedges. This deep fried chicken snack offers crispness and crunch in every bite and is a real treat with a cup of boba tea.

Just like the fries, you can also offer them in a variety of flavors, including spicy for those who like a kick in their snacks.

#3 Spicy Tofu Bites

Speaking of spicy, you can offer spiced tofu bites to clients who take big risks and are looking for sensations. Get the hottest flavor you can get like a Carolina Reaper Chili Powder to spice up the tofu in a hurry.

You can also add baked basil leaves to add color, aroma, flavor, and texture.

#4 Nachos

Nachos are perfect savory snacks as there are many toppings to choose from. Along with the usual cheese, ground beef, beans, jalapeno, and salsa, consider the following toppings:

Prawns and avocado for seafood lovers

Buffalo chicken for those who love smoky food

Offering eggs and bacon during breakfast hours

Pesto for vegetarians

Sausages and peppers to recreate a pizza flavor

#5 Savory Avocado Toast

Spiced up avocado toast bursting with flavor is sure to become your customers’ favourite. Avocado’s nutty flavor pairs well with egg, cheese, bacon, and even mushrooms for vegans. Just like the nachos, you can create different flavors of savory avocado toast to give your customers plenty of choice. Here are some variations you might want to try:

Avocado toast with bacon and egg perfect for breakfast

Mediterranean Avocado Toast with crumbled feta cheese and balsamic goodness

Smoked Salmon Avocado Toast for seafood lovers

Mushroom and avocado toast for vegans

Avocado toast with ham and sausage for meat lovers

Sweet Snacks:

#1 Mochi

Mochis are traditional Japanese desserts that are chewy rice cakes. This makes them a perfect match for tapioca pearl drinks as they have the same texture.

You can offer mochis in different flavors, and since they come in many different colors, you can pair them with boba tea drinks and boba supplies of the same color.

#2 Homemade Cookies

Don’t just offer store-bought cookies. Homemade ones are always the best because they take you back to childhood. Opt for the chewy ones with just the right amount of sweetness and bitterness.

Offer your customers a variety of flavors—classic chocolate chip cookies, mint chocolate chip cookies, matcha cookies, and other fruit-flavored cookies.

#3 Belgian Waffles

Belgian waffles not only go perfectly with coffee, but also with boba tea drinks. Belgian waffles are made with a lighter batter and have larger squares and deeper pockets than the American variety. This makes them perfect for spreading sweet jam on them.

Make those waffles even more tempting by offering them in different flavors. Some flavors to consider are:

Orange jam

Strawberry jam

blueberry jam

chocolate syrup

Chocolate Hazelnut

Classic pudding

caramel

Coffee

#4 Sweet Pies

These sweet tartlets can add a crunchy element while enjoying a boba tea beverage. They consist of a dough base and sweet fillings, and most often the fillings are made from citrus fruits. These little delights offer a burst of sweetness and acidity in the mouth.

Just like the Belgian waffles, you can offer sweet tarts in different flavors. Here are some you can try:

strawberry lemonade

berries and cream

Raspberry Almond

Plum and Almond Cream

Blackberry Lime Cheesecake

#5 Caramel Popcorn

Finally, caramel popcorn also pairs well with boba tea drinks. This sweet twist on the popular American snack offers customers a sweet crunch while enjoying their favorite beverage, Boba Tea.

To make this snack even more fun, you can add natural food coloring and offer it in different colors to attract your younger customers and the kids at heart.

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Do braces not eat list?

Foods to avoid with your braces are:
  • Nuts.
  • Potato chips.
  • Popcorn.
  • Crunchy veggies.
  • Hard candies (such as jolly ranchers or lollipops)
  • Gum (Sugar-free gum is okay)
  • Sticky candies (like laffy-taffy or gummy bears)
  • Corn on the cob.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

Wondering what foods you can eat while wearing braces? Can you still have pizza? What about chewing gum? Will you only eat soft foods in the next two years? What do you avoid completely with braces? These are all good questions to think about if you’re considering braces in the future!

The good news is that you don’t have to stick to a totally soft diet for the next two years. There are many good foods that you can still have while wearing your braces. Awareness of “good” and “bad” food is very important so that you can take care of your braces throughout your treatment and get the best results.

Why certain foods must be avoided with braces

Your braces may have brackets, bands, and archwires, all of which can be damaged by certain foods. Avoiding very hard or sticky food is a big priority. In addition to avoiding certain foods, proper hygiene is essential to ensure no cavities form around the braces. If food debris is not properly cleaned from teeth and braces, tartar and plaque can build up, which can cause white stains on the surfaces of teeth.

Foods you can’t eat with braces

Crunchy and sticky foods like nuts and gum, and candy like lollipops and candy canes can loosen brackets and wires, which can delay treatment. Foods to avoid with your braces include:

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nuts

Potato Chips

Popcorn

Crunchy vegetables

Candies (such as Jolly Ranchers or lollipops)

chewing gum (sugar-free gum is fine)

Sticky candies (like laffy taffy or jelly beans)

corn on the cob

apples

Beef jerky

pizza crust

It’s not just hard foods that can damage the devices in your mouth! Other things and habits to avoid that could damage brackets are:

pen chewing

chewing pencil

Chewing finger nails

toothpick

chew straw

It is important not to chew on hard objects!

Foods you can eat with braces

Now that you know what you can’t have with braces, let’s talk about all the good things you can have! While there are many things to avoid with braces, there are many tasty things to still enjoy. For example, you can still enjoy:

pasta

Mashed potatoes

Boneless meat

soft vegetables

fruit

soups

Dairy products

Soft breads and sandwiches

casseroles

Pizza (without crust)

Even with braces we can enjoy the beautiful things in life! At each visit, Dr. Green and your dental assistant will check the braces for damage to the brackets or plaque build-up. All of our patients receive a short course after their braces are fitted to learn how to best care for your appliances to ensure they stay in tip-top shape throughout your treatment. Remembering the “Do’s” and “Don’ts” can have a huge impact on your treatment outcome and will help get that beautiful smile you’ve always dreamed of!

Why do my braces hurt more at night?

Generally, this is simply because your gums and cheeks aren’t yet used to the dental apparatus being in your mouth. A certain amount of pain and discomfort is completely normal during this period. However, there are things you can do to alleviate the soreness and catch more Z’s.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

When you start wearing braces, the quality of your sleep may suffer in the first few days or weeks. Generally, this is simply because your gums and cheeks are not yet used to the dental apparatus being in your mouth. Some level of pain and discomfort is completely normal during this time. However, there are things you can do to ease the pain and catch more Z’s.

If you’re considering orthodontics, give the team at Forest Lawn Dental Center a call – your premier destination for affordable braces in Calgary. Read on below for useful tips on sleeping comfortably with your new braces.

Dealing with chafing of brackets and wires

It is normal for brackets and wires to irritate your cheeks and gums for the first week that you wear your new braces. The inside of your mouth tends to be sensitive, but it quickly hardens in response to wearing braces.

In the meantime, you can use dental wax to make your braces less abrasive. In most cases, your dentist will provide you with the tooth wax. Apply to your brackets and any protruding wire before you go to bed. This goes a long way to preventing irritation. (And don’t worry if you accidentally swallow some of the wax—it’s completely non-toxic.)

You should also pay attention to your sleeping position. When you sleep on your side or on your stomach – and so your face is on the side of your pillow – your braces will rub against your cheek. Sleeping on your back is the better option.

Coping with pain from teeth grinding

Grinding your teeth and wearing braces don’t go together. In fact, getting your teeth clamped onto components of your braces can cause quite a bit of pain – even enough to wake you up!

If you grind your teeth in your sleep, you probably need a night guard, a flexible mouthguard that protects your teeth. It is best to talk to your dentist in advance about this option so that you can wear your night splint right from the start.

Avoiding discomfort by cleaning and caring for your teeth

The best way to properly care for your braces is to give them a thorough cleaning every night, as recommended by your dentist. If you haven’t cleaned your teeth and braces well, you may have a tendency to use your tongue to remove leftover food debris while lying in bed. However, your brackets and wires can irritate your tongue, especially if you are just beginning to wear braces.

Talk to us about orthodontics in Calgary at Forest Lawn Dental Center today

If you’re thinking of getting braces for yourself or a family member, speak to the dental team at Forest Lawn Dental Center in Calgary. Our experienced family dentist will work with you to create a dental care plan tailored to your individual needs – Contact us today!

What’s the average time you wear braces?

On average, it takes about 24 months to complete an orthodontic treatment. Some patients require less than 12 months, but there are also patients requiring up to 3 years of treatment before their teeth reach the desired position. Orthodontics is not a one-size-fits-all solution and each patient’s mouth is unique.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

My patients usually ask themselves this question in the first consultation. Adults are particularly concerned about the length of time it takes them to wear braces.

On average, orthodontic treatment lasts about 24 months. Some patients need less than 12 months, but there are also patients who need up to 3 years of treatment before their teeth reach the desired position.

Orthodontics is not a one-size-fits-all solution and every patient’s mouth is unique. So, while I can’t tell you with certainty the exact length of treatment for your particular case, I can explain the factors that affect the length of time braces are worn.

kind of treatment

Patients who need orthodontic treatment now have several options. There are conventional metal clasps, ceramic clasps and clear clasps. Metal braces are made of stainless steel, which makes this system very strong and robust. Ceramic braces and clear aligners, on the other hand, look nicer than metal braces

Age

Young patients (teens and children) tend to achieve faster results than adults because their jaws are still growing and teeth are more easily manipulated. That doesn’t mean that all adults have to wear braces for two years or more. There are other factors that affect the length of treatment.

gravity of the case

Another determining factor is the severity of your orthodontic problem. Mild gaps/crowding can be resolved in a year or less, while severe cases can take much longer.

patient reliability

An orthodontic patient must follow all of their orthodontist’s instructions to ensure successful treatment. This includes maintaining proper oral hygiene, keeping your dental appointments, and using your orthodontic appliances as intended.

Yes. Here at The Brace Place we are excited to offer our patients the Propel Technology. Propel helps teeth move more quickly into their desired position, resulting in significantly shorter treatment times. Whether patients choose traditional braces or clear aligners like Invisalign, this innovative technology ensures treatment is effective and fast.

Other treatments that reduce treatment time are Acceledent and Vpro AcceleDent and Vpro use cyclic force and gentle pulse technology to move teeth.

The only way to determine how long you will need orthodontic treatment is to consult an orthodontist. We take photos and X-rays of your mouth and create an individual treatment plan for you. We’ll also discuss expedited options so you can have the smile you’ve always wanted in no time.

Does boba cause acne?

Due to its sugary content, the beverage is known to also cause acne and inflammation of the skin. The tapioca pearls are high in carb and low on nutrients. They’re worse when they’re boiled in sugar because this can cause your skin pores to clog. Regular drinkers of boba often suffer from skin problems.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

> article

If you’re a regular bubble tea drinker, maybe it’s time to slow down.

Malaysian-Singapore actor Lawrence Wong recently revealed that drinking bubble tea made his face sag.

In an interview with Toggle, the avid Boba fan said he used to drink a cup a day, but stopped when he realized the drink did more than just lead to weight gain.

“That’s my own observation — it makes your face droop. That’s why I’m controlling myself, even though it’s a bit difficult,” he said.

Due to its sugar content, the drink is also known to cause acne and skin inflammation. The tapioca pearls are high in carbohydrates and low in nutrients. They are worse when boiled in sugar as this can cause your skin pores to become clogged.

Those who regularly drink boba often suffer from skin problems. The one that Wong experienced could likely have been a collagen and skin elastin breakdown.

Too much sugar raises insulin levels, which then leads to oxidative stress and inflammation. The excess carbohydrates from the drink go through a process called glycation. It involves binding refined sugar to the collagen proteins and fats in the skin.

When this happens, a new substance is created. Enter advanced glycation end products. Or short for AGEs. These are enzymes that weaken elastin fibers and collagen, leaving your skin dull, wrinkled, and saggy.

Oops!

Maybe it’s time to cut back on your bubble tea consumption if you want to look younger?

So how does the Story of Yanxi Palace star control his boba shot while maintaining his physique?

The answer lies in salads.

“If I know I’ll have bubble tea later, I eat a salad for lunch. I make sure I have enough “quota” for it if I know I will have one. This is my motivation for the day!”

The actor also eliminated his bubble tea to go calorie-free by removing sugar and drinking milk tea made with fresh milk.

“The powders or cream that some drinks have make you super fat. I don’t add sugar because the pearls or nata de coco also have sugar. I used to order drinks with custard, but I gave up because it’s also a lot of sugar,” he reveals.

His current Boba Cup pick is green tea latte with no sugar, very little ice, giant pearls, and nata de coco.

Brown sugar milk tea is the unhealthiest, according to Singapore’s private, not-for-profit tertiary-care medical facility, Mount Alvernia Hospital.

The hospital recently published an article on its website comparing the unhealthy amount of sugar and high calorie content of different types of bubble tea.

PICTURE: Facebook / Mount Alvernia Hospital

Based on his findings, the brown sugar milk tea contains 18.5 teaspoons of sugar. The second unhealthiest is winter melon tea, which contains 16 teaspoons of sugar.

These sugar values ​​are far above the amount that a healthy person should consume daily: 8 – 11 teaspoons for adults, 5 teaspoons for children and adolescents.

Livestrong explains that not only is the drink unhealthy, but it also lacks the right nutrients. Even the healthiest version of this packs 150 calories into a single serving.

For this reason, the healthy living website recommends consuming the drink occasionally.

Sorry Wong, it looks like you need to eliminate boba from your diet entirely if you really want to stay healthy.

Cover photo by Phoenix and Lawrence Wong.

Does boba make you poop?

Since the additive expands when it comes in contact with water, it can cause constipation when consumed in high quantities and without enough water to wash it all down.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

If you drink boba every day, here’s what happens

There’s a reason boba, or bubble tea, is so popular. Although the drink originated in Taiwan, it has recently become popular across the United States, and shops dedicated to making the tea are popping up everywhere. Thrillist notes that boba tea’s boom is due in part to its popularity with college students and the availability of the caffeinated milk beverage near college campuses.

Boba can be used to refer to both the black tapioca pearls and the drink as a whole (via Eater). However, the drink itself goes by different names — it may be called boba tea, bubble tea, or pearl milk tea — depending on where you are in the world. Whatever you call the tea, boba is usually made with black tea, milk, ice, and tapioca pearls.

Part of Boba Tea’s popularity is that you can do pretty much anything to customize it. Aside from adding syrup and toppings, the chewy tapioca pearls come in a variety of flavors. They are also quite addictive. According to Eater, tapioca pearls start out as hard and tasteless little balls. They are then boiled and soaked in a caramelized sugar syrup until they turn black, bouncy and delicious.

It may be a well-known fact that boba can be irresistible, but what happens when you drink it every day?

Should I get boba?

Just because it has tea, doesn’t mean it’s healthy

According to the ReThink Your Asian Drink campaign, a regular boba drink typically has 300 calories and 19 grams of sugar, and the more complicated drinks can have upwards of 500 to 600 calories and nearly 50 grams of sugar.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

Given how popular milk tea is in Berkeley, I get a lot of confused looks after telling people I don’t drink boba. I can understand why, as it’s almost as common to see a student walk into class with a drink of Sharetea as one with a Peet’s coffee. So many people drink boba that it’s almost safe to assume everyone is a fan, but that’s not the case. While I’m in the minority on this one, there are serious reasons why you should reconsider your next boba outing.

1. The costs add up quickly

Holly Park

Even without toppings, a regular boba drink can cost anywhere from $3 to $5. If you buy a drink twice a week, the cost can add up to $200 per semester! Imagine there was a section labeled “Boba Fund” for your estimated cost of participation. For more frequent boba users, the cost could be closer to what you spend on textbooks. Imagine all the money you could save if you didn’t drink boba—or that much boba.

2. Just because it contains tea doesn’t mean it’s healthy

Holly Park

In fact, the nutritional value of milk tea borders on the level of a Starbucks Frappuccino. According to the ReThink Your Asian Drink campaign, a regular boba drink typically has 300 calories and 19 grams of sugar, and the more complicated drinks can have 500 to 600 calories and nearly 50 grams of sugar. At this point, that order of milk tea becomes tantamount to a meal. The main reason I don’t drink boba? I would rather eat my calories than drink them.

3. There are better and healthier alternatives

Holly Park

I say stick to the “tea” part. Green tea is quite strong on its own. It boosts your immune system and even has the caffeine you need to stay mentally alert in class. If that’s not your thing, choose another strain! There are so many different types of tea that offer unique health benefits. Buy them in bulk and you’ll have a long lasting supply that will put you off buying Boba.

You can also try making your own milk tea at home using store-bought tapioca balls. This way you control what goes into your drink while making a more cost-effective choice.

Holly Park

If that’s too much hassle, consider drinks that contain less sugar or look for stores that don’t use artificially flavored syrups. With the wide variety of options on the menu and the multitude of shops that surround the Berkeley campus, you’re bound to find another drink that satisfies your sweet tooth and is a little kinder to your waistline.

#Spoontip: Ask workers for less sugar or syrup in your drinks!

Holly Park

If you like your order just the way it is, I respect that. But even limiting your drinks a little can go a long way. Maybe consider using that money for a new restaurant you wanted to try, or spend a little more money on your groceries.

Change is difficult, but I guarantee these alternatives will lead to a healthier lifestyle and not make it so scary to check your bank account status. While you may not understand the reasons why I don’t drink boba, at least I won’t sound 100% crazy the next time I turn down a boba run invitation.

Does boba digest in your stomach?

Bubble tea balls are easily digestible for most people

Since tapioca comes from the starch-based cassava root, it’s mainly filled with carbohydrates, according to Healthline. Starches like cassava function similarly to fiber in the body, and healthy people can digest them with no problems, Dr. de Latour said.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

According to Chinese newspaper Shaoxing News, doctors found over 100 bubble tea balls in a 14-year-old girl’s digestive system after she complained of stomach pain and couldn’t poop for five days.

She told doctors she drank a cup of bubble tea five days before arriving at the hospital, but one of the doctors who treated her believes she drank more of the drink.

Most people can digest Bubble Tea Balls without any problems. The girl probably consumed too much of it in a short period of time, which overwhelmed her digestive system, said Dr. Rabia De Latour to INSIDER.

You can find more information on the INSIDER homepage.

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Doctors found over 100 bubble tea balls in a 14-year-old Chinese girl’s digestive tract, raising questions about the health effects of consuming the sugary drink and associated balls.

The girl complained of abdominal pain and constipation for five days, and when she arrived at the hospital, her doctor used a CT scan to determine the bubble tea balls were the culprit, according to Chinese newspaper Shaoxing News.

Bubble tea (also called boba tea) is a traditional Taiwanese drink made with iced tea, milk, fruits and flavorings. These drinks also contain edible tapioca “bubbles” or “pearls,” the same balls that Dr. Zhang found in the girl’s digestive tract.

The girl said she only had a boba tea drink five days before her hospital visit, but Dr. Zhang believes she would have had to drink a lot more than she admitted to cause such a severe blockage.

Bubble tea balls shouldn’t be a cause for concern for most people, said Dr. Rabia de Latour, a gastroenterologist and assistant professor of medicine at NYU Langone Health, told INSIDER.

“What I took away from that situation was that she was nervous about telling her parents how much she had,” said Dr. de Latour. “Most people who drink bubble tea don’t see the bubbles in their stool [when they poop]. I think she just overwhelmed her system.”

Bubble Tea Balls are easy to digest for most people

Because tapioca comes from the starch-based cassava root, it’s mostly packed with carbs, according to Healthline. Starches like cassava function similarly to fiber in the body, and healthy people can digest them easily, said Dr. de Latour.

A 2009 study even compared the digestibility of various Sri Lankan starches such as yams, taro and arrowroot and found that cassava is one of the most easily digestible root vegetable starches.

Read more: 14 of the biggest myths about nutrition and dieting, debunked

To help the girl digest and eliminate the bubble tea, her doctor gave her laxatives.

“This story does not mean that boba tea is dangerous. It just goes to show that everything should be done in moderation, especially since these drinks also contain very little nutritional value and are high in sugar,” said Dr. de Latour.

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What happens if you swallow a boba?

He advised the family that a bubble tea habit likely caused the buildup of tapioca balls inside the girl’s stomach. Also, according to the x-ray provided by Shaoxing News, it appears that the girl may have been swallowing the boba whole, which is probably a choking hazard and not great for your digestion.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

You probably know what bubble tea is. But if not, I’ll tell you about this refreshing drink that you have to try for yourself. Bubble tea usually contains some type of tea, flavoring, sugar, and the main ingredient, tapioca balls, sometimes known as boba, or the bubble in “bubble tea.” Tapioca balls are the round, chewy things you find at the bottom of the tea. Once you’ve had bubble tea, you probably always want it. But a word of warning. One girl’s bubble tea habit reportedly landed her in the hospital. According to Shaoxing News, a teenager collected about 100 undigested bubble tea balls in her stomach.

According to reports, the doctor made the discovery when the girl was taken to the hospital by her parents. Before she was admitted, she had complained of severe abdominal pain and constipation. To diagnose her properly, the doctor at Zhuji People’s Hospital in Zhejiang province in China ordered a CT scan. According to the news report, the doctor noticed that the girl’s abdomen was bloated and that was a cause for concern.

When the results of the test came back, the scans showed the teen’s digestive tract was lined with “grainy shadows,” according to the Shaoxing News. The doctor then asked the teenager if she had recently eaten anything that would cause those shadows. The teenager replied that she had been drinking bubble tea days before the hospital visit, but the doctor believes it was a lot more than just one.

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He told the family that a bubble tea habit likely led to the girl’s stomach building up with tapioca balls. Also, according to the X-ray provided by Shaoxing News, it appears that the girl swallowed the boba whole, which is likely a choking hazard and not good for your digestion. Luckily for the girl, the treatment was fairly minor. The doctor prescribed a laxative to flush the tiny globules out of her system.

But no worry. That doesn’t mean you have to stop drinking bubble tea. Chances are you’re not eating enough to end up in the hospital like this alleged teenager. However, if you think you have a serious addiction, then this story should serve as a warning.

Is boba hard to digest?

The drink, which originated in Taiwan, is also known as pearl milk tea or boba. It typically contains dozens of starchy tapioca balls, which are notoriously hard to digest.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

A teenager who drank two cups of the popular drink bubble tea was taken to hospital after he couldn’t digest the starchy balls and they formed two hard lumps in his colon.

The solid objects, known as faecaliths — or stones made from faeces — measured two and three centimeters in size, according to a report by the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University in central China’s Henan province last Thursday.

Pediatric surgeon Zhang Haiyang, who treated the boy late last year, said the boy’s intestinal obstruction was most likely caused by his love of bubble tea.

The drink, which originated in Taiwan, is also known as pearl milk tea or boba.

Picture Shows: An X-ray showing Zhu Li’s stomach filled with undigested tapioca balls. Source: AsiaWire/Australscope

It usually contains dozens of starchy tapioca balls that are notoriously difficult to digest.

“Around 3 am while I was on call, a 13-year-old boy was brought in with sudden abdominal pain,” recalled Doctor Zhang.

“X-rays indicated an intestinal obstruction.”

The teenager was observed overnight and surgery was scheduled the next day when his condition did not improve.

“On examining his intestines, we discovered two solid objects, one larger and one smaller,” said Dr. Zhang.

“These two objects caused his disability.”

Because the objects looked relatively soft and could be crushed, the hospital said the surgeons decided against excising the objects from the boy’s colon.

“About two or three days after the surgery, he was able to make her pass out with his chair,” the doctor said.

A second scan shows the boy’s body while one person points out the intestinal obstruction. Source: AsiaWire/Australscope

“While collecting more medical histories, the young patient said he drank a cup of bubble tea about a week before his symptoms began.

“He didn’t chew the blisters and swallowed them whole.

“He had another cup about three to four days later, and on both occasions he wasn’t chewing and just swallowing.

“It is therefore very likely that the tapioca pearls stuck together and caused his intestinal obstruction.”

Bubble tea is a popular drink. Source: Getty Images

The teenager suffered no long-term effects from the ordeal.

In June 2019, a 14-year-old girl from Zhejiang province in east China was found with undigested tapioca balls in her stomach and intestines.

The story goes on

They were also the result of her favorite drink, bubble tea, and she was constipated for five days.

– Australscope

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What do boba balls taste like?

What Does Boba Taste Like? Mostly, very sweet! Usually frothy yet creamy with the texture of tapioca balls when slurped through a straw. Not quite as icy cold or as thick as a milkshake or juice bar drink, unless it’s a slushy version.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

What is Bubble Tea (aka Boba) and what does it taste like?

You’ve heard of bubble tea, but do you know what it is?

What is Boba/Bubble Tea?

Bubble tea (also known as Pearl Milk Tea, Tapioca Tea, Boba Nai Cha, Boba Milk Tea or just Boba) is a tea-based beverage invented in the tea shops of Taichung, Taiwan in the 1980s.

The recipe usually includes a tea base mixed with either milk or fruit. There are also slush-style versions that are mixed with ice along with syrup or fruit. Bubble tea is most commonly served cold.

Bubble tea is available in two different flavors: either milk-based or fruit-flavored. However, some stores offer hybrids called “fruit milk teas”. Most bubble teas come with small chewy tapioca balls (粉圓, fěnyuán) typically called pearls (珍珠, zhēnzhū) or boba (波霸, bōbà).

The most popular types of bubble tea are Bubble Milk Tea with Tapioca and Bubble Milk Green Tea with Tapioca.

Many bubble tea shops in America sell “milk smoothies” or ice cream shakes that are based on the Boba concept but do not contain any tea ingredients. Some Boba cafes offer a substitute for sugar in the drink, e.g. B. stevia or agave. It’s common to see it in clear plastic cups with dome-shaped lids, but many bubble tea bars now have machines that allow them to seal the top with cellophane to create a spill-free cup (which can also be shaken). is then pierced with a large straw to allow the beads to fit through.

The “bubbles” in bubble tea.

Types, Flavors and Textures of Bubble Tea

Tea Base: The tea base is either black tea (usually Oolong or Earl Gray), green tea (usually jasmine) or even coffee!

The tea base is either black tea (usually Oolong or Earl Grey), green tea (usually jasmine) or even coffee! Fruit Flavors: Some common fruit flavors include strawberry, green apple, passion fruit, mango, lemon, watermelon, lychee, peach, pineapple, honeydew melon, honeydew melon, banana, avocado, coconut, kiwi, and jackfruit.

Some common fruit flavors include strawberry, green apple, passion fruit, mango, lemon, watermelon, lychee, peach, pineapple, honeydew melon, honeydew melon, banana, avocado, coconut, kiwi, and jackfruit. Non-Fruit Flavors: Popular non-fruit flavors include taro, custard, chocolate, coffee, mocha, barley, sesame, almond, ginger, lavender, rose, caramel, and violet.

Popular non-fruit flavors include taro, custard, chocolate, coffee, mocha, barley, sesame, almond, ginger, lavender, rose, caramel, and violet. Snow Bubble: This is a type of boba-based drink that is prepared using flavorings mixed with ice instead of the usual tea or coffee base. The same mix-ins can still be used with these slush-type boba drinks.

This is a type of boba-based drink that is prepared with an ice-mixed flavoring instead of the usual tea or coffee base. The same mix-ins can still be used with these slush-type boba drinks. Tapioca Balls: These are the most commonly added chewy candies, but there are a variety of other options to add texture to the drink, such as green pearls with a hint of green tea flavor, jelly cubes in flavors like coconut jelly, konjac, lychee, grass, and Mango.

These are the most commonly added chewy candies, but there are a whole host of other options to add texture to the drink, such as: grass and mango. Beans: Azuki bean or mung bean paste can also add an additional subtle flavor and texture to beverages.

Azuki bean or mung bean paste can also add an additional subtle flavor and texture to beverages. Foam Red Tea: (The English name “foam tea” is not really used throughout Asia.) This is a bubble tea made without tapioca. It is mixed in a cocktail shaker with hot or warm tea along with syrup or sugar and ice cubes. The froth or froth is then created by mixing the drink either by hand or with a machine.

(The English name “foam tea” isn’t really used throughout Asia.) This is a bubble tea made without tapioca. It is mixed in a cocktail shaker with hot or warm tea along with syrup or sugar and ice cubes. The froth or froth is then created by mixing the drink either by hand or with a machine. Milk Foam Tea: Similar, but with added milk.

Similar but with added milk. Black Pearl Milk Tea: Made from black tapioca balls or “pearls”.

Made from black tapioca balls or “pearls”. Instant Bubble Tea: This is made by DeDe or various other brands. It can be bought in some countries and consists of single-serving black tea packets with powdered milk and sugar.

To conquer the world

Since its invention in East Asia in the 1980s, bubble tea has grown in popularity in the UK, Australia and the United States, with boba bars and shops springing up, particularly in larger cities.

Consumers continue to enjoy all types of bubble tea despite various criticisms of nutritional value, choking hazards, and chemical additives.

This is one of the reasons why making boba at home has become very popular – when you make bubble tea yourself you know exactly what is going into the drink and therefore have a better idea of ​​how healthy and safe it is She. Not to mention that you can customize the flavor and sweetness to your liking when making your own pearl milk tea.

Even McDonald’s is participating!

According to huffingtonpost.com: “In June 2012, McDonald’s McCafé locations in Germany and Austria began offering bubble tea. They offer black, green or white tea, available with or without milk. Fruit syrups are also available, bringing the total number of possible flavor combinations to 250.”

How does Boba taste?

Mostly very cute! Usually frothy yet creamy with the texture of tapioca balls when sipped through a straw. Not quite as ice cold or thick as a milkshake or juice bar drink, unless it’s a slushy version. And the actual taste depends on whether you order a milk-based or fruit-based bubble tea. Think juice bar or milkshake flavors, unless of course you order one of the more exotic tasting boba teas.

Where can you get it in Australia

Easy Way Bubble Tea – they have 67 stores across Australia – www.easywaytea.com.au/stores/view-all/

– they have 67 stores across Australia – www.easywaytea.com.au/stores/view-all/ Chatime – they have multiple stores in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide – www.chatime.com.au/location.php

– They have multiple branches in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide – www.chatime.com.au/location.php Happy Lemon in Glebe, Sydney – www.happy-lemon.com

in Glebe, Sydney – www.happy-lemon.com Gong Cha – 601 George Street, Sydney – www.gongchatea.com.au/location/

– 601 George Street, Sydney – www.gongchatea.com.au/location/ Gumballs – They have a few branches in Sydney as well as one in Melbourne (Abbotsford) and one in Queensland (Logan) – www.gumballs. com.au/where_are_we.html

– They have a few branches in Sydney, as well as one in Melbourne (Abbotsford) and one in Queensland (Logan) – www.gumballs.com.au/where_are_we.html Hazel Tea Shop – K22 Sunnybank Hills Shoppingtown, Cnr Calam & Compton Rd, Sunny Bank, QLD

– K22 Sunnybank Hills Shoppingtown, Cnr Calam & Compton Rd, Sunnybank, QLD Tea etc. – 115 Queen St, Brisbane Queensland

– 115 Queen St, Brisbane Queensland Tea Bar – 322 Moggill Rd, Indooroopilly Shopping Centre, Indooroopilly, QLD

– 322 Moggill Rd, Indooroopilly Shopping Centre, Indooroopilly, QLD Mo Mo Bubble Tea & Coffee House – 69 Murray Street, Hobart – www.facebook.com/pages/Mo-Mo-Bubble-Tea-and-Coffee-House/295405284051

– 69 Murray Street, Hobart – www.facebook.com/pages/Mo-Mo-Bubble-Tea-and-Coffee-House/295405284051 Thea Tea Shop – 110 Gawler Place, Adelaide

– 110 Gawler Place, Adelaide Fruitop – Myer Center Food Court (lower level): 22 Rundle Mall, Adelaide – www.yelp.com.au/biz/fruitop-juice-bar-adelaide

– Myer Center Food Court (lower level): 22 Rundle Mall, Adelaide – www.yelp.com.au/biz/fruitop-juice-bar-adelaide Genuine Taiwan Pearl Bubble Milk Tea – 93 Grote St, Adelaide

– 93 Grote St, Adelaide Ten Ren’s Tea Station – 146 Swanston Street, Melbourne

146 Swanston Street, Melbourne Bubble Cup – they are the largest pearl milk / bubble tea chain in Melbourne and have several stores across the city and suburbs – www.bubblecup.com.au/store-locations/

– They are the largest Pearl Milk Tea/Bubble Tea chain in Melbourne and have multiple stores across the city and suburbs – www.bubblecup.com.au/store-locations/ Glow Taiwanese Cafe – 448 Bridge Rd, Richmond, Victoria – www.yelp.com.au/biz/glow-taiwanese-cafe-richmond-2

– 448 Bridge Rd, Richmond, Victoria – www.yelp.com.au/biz/glow-taiwanese-cafe-richmond-2 Healthy Cup – with five locations in Melbourne and one store in Queensland – www.healthycup.com.au/ Locations.html

– with five locations in Melbourne and one store in Queensland – www.healthycup.com.au/locations.html Chat For Tea – 25 Armstrong St N, Ballarat, Victoria

– 25 Armstrong St N, Ballarat, Victoria Utopia – Multiple locations in Western Australia – www.utopia-aust.com/eng/store/main.php?id=11

– Multiple locations in Western Australia – www.utopia-aust.com/eng/store/main.php?id=11 Yogurama – Shop K6 (near Coles Mall), Innaloo, WA.

– Shop K6 (near Coles Mall), Innaloo, WA. Presotea – 81 Barrack Street, Perth, WA – www.urbanspoon.com/r/338/1684592/restaurant/Perth-CBD/Presotea-Perth

Where to get it in the US

Lollicup – with multiple stores in the US – www.lollicup.com/locations.php

– with multiple stores in the US – www.lollicup.com/locations.php Quickly – multiple locations in the US – www.quicklyusa.com/quicklystores.html

– Multiple locations across the US – www.quicklyusa.com/quicklystores.html Boba Tea House – Three locations: 2055 N. Dobson Rd, Chandler, AZ. 8139 Elk Grove Blvd. #140, Elk Grove, CA 25696 Barton Road, Loma Linda, CA.

– Three locations: 2055 N. Dobson Rd, Chandler, AZ. 8139 Elk Grove Blvd. #140, Elk Grove, CA 25696 Barton Road, Loma Linda, CA. Vivi Bubble Tea – 49 Bayard St, New York, NY (Chinatown)

– 49 Bayard St, New York, NY (Chinatown) Big Bear Bubble Tea – 57-16 Woodside Ave, Woodside, NY

– 57-16 Woodside Ave, Woodside, NY ThirsTea – 280 E 10th St, New York, NY

– 280 E 10th St, New York, NY Teariffic – 51 Mott St, New York, NY (Chinatown)

– 51 Mott St, New York, NY (Chinatown) Coco Fresh Tea and Juice – 459 Lexington Ave, New York, NY

– 459 Lexington Ave, New York, NY Tapioca Story – 27-22 30 Ave, Astoria, NY

– 27-22 30 Ave, Astoria, NY Hi Tea Cafe – 2114 86th St, Brooklyn, NY

– 2114 86th St, Brooklyn, NY Cha-An – 230 E 9th St, New York, NY

– 230 E 9th St, New York, NY JoJu – 83-25 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY

– 83-25 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY Something Sweet – 314 New Dorp Ln, Staten Island, NY

– 314 New Dorp Ln, Staten Island, NY Share Tea – 37-27 Main St, Flushing, NY

– 37-27 Main St, Flushing, NY Little Bean – 18902 Norwalk Blvd, Artesia, California

– 18902 Norwalk Blvd, Artesia, California I Love Boba – 534 S Western Avenue, Los Angeles, California

– 534 S Western Avenue, Los Angeles, California Cha For Tea – 5720 E 7th Street, Long Beach, California

– 5720 E 7th Street, Long Beach, California Aloha Boba – 666 W Huntington Drive, Monrovia, California

– 666 W Huntington Drive, Monrovia, California Ten Ren – 727 N Broadway, Los Angeles, California

– 727 N Broadway, Los Angeles, California Yo Cafe – 3500 W 6th St, Los Angeles, California

– 3500 W 6th St, Los Angeles, California Boba 7 – 518 W 7th St, Los Angeles, California

– 518 W 7th St, Los Angeles, California Ozero Tea & Desserts – 131 Central Ave, Los Angeles, California

– 131 Central Ave, Los Angeles, California Four Leaf Tea and Crepes – 318 E 2nd St, Los Angeles, California

– 318 E 2nd St, Los Angeles, California Volcano Tea House – 2111 Sawtelle Blvd, Los Angeles, California

– 2111 Sawtelle Blvd, Los Angeles, California Boba Express – 9653 Las Tunas Dr, Temple City, California

– 9653 Las Tunas Dr, Temple City, California Boba Time – They have various stores in Koreatown and the LA area – 3450 W 6th St, Los Angeles, California. 125 N Western Ave, Los Angeles, California. 701 S Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, California. 11207 National Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

– They have various stores in Koreatown and around LA – 3450 W 6th St, Los Angeles, California. 125 N Western Ave, Los Angeles, California. 701 S Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, California. 11207 National Boulevard, Los Angeles, California. Boba Loca – 10946 Weyburn Ave, Los Angeles, California

– 10946 Weyburn Ave, Los Angeles, California Tapioca Express – 228 W Valley Blvd, Alhambra, California

– 228 W Valley Blvd, Alhambra, California Wonderful Foods Co – 2035 Irving St, San Francisco, California

– 2035 Irving St, San Francisco, California Sweethut – 519 Clement St, San Francisco, California

– 519 Clement St, San Francisco, California Belly Good Cafe & Crepes – 1737 Post St, San Francisco, California

– 1737 Post Street, San Francisco, California Boba Guys – 3378 18th St, San Francisco, California

– 3378 18th St, San Francisco, California Rockit Swirl – 2810 Diamond St, San Francisco, California

– 2810 Diamond St, San Francisco, California Sweetheart Cafe – 909 Grant Ave, San Francisco, California

– 909 Grant Ave, San Francisco, California Chai-Yo Candy & Treats – 1335 Polk St, San Francisco, California

– 1335 Polk St, San Francisco, California Joy Yee’s Noodle Shop – Chinatown, Chicago, IL plus some other IL locations – www.joyyee.com/

– Chinatown, Chicago, IL plus a few other IL locations – www.joyyee.com/ Chill Bubble Tea – they have two locations in Illinois – www.chillbubbletea.com/locations/

– They have two locations in Illinois – www.chillbubbletea.com/locations/ Heung Fa Chun Sweet House – 112 N 10th St, Philadelphia, PA

– 112 N 10th St, Philadelphia, PA Cups and Chairs – 701-03 S 5th St, Philadelphia, PA

– 701-03 S 5th St, Philadelphia, PA Ray’s Cafe and Teahouse – 141 N 9th St, Philadelphia, PA

– 141 N 9th St, Philadelphia, PA Greenland Tea House – 210 N 9th St, Philadelphia, PA

– 210 N 9th Street, Philadelphia, PA Zhong Gang – 127 N 10th Street, Philadelphia, PA

– 127 N 10th Street, Philadelphia, PA Ken Shin Asian Diner – 301 Spring Garden St, Philadelphia, PA

– 301 Spring Garden St, Philadelphia, PA Rising Tide – 937 Race St, Philadelphia, PA

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– 937 Race St, Philadelphia, PA Thinking Cup – 165 Tremont St, Boston, MA

– 165 Tremont St, Boston, MA Pho Basil – 177 Massachusetts Ave, Boston, MA

– 177 Massachusetts Ave, Boston, MA The Juice Bar – 40-44 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA

– 40-44 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA Leisure Station – 625 W Kendall St, Cambridge, MA

– 625 W Kendall St, Cambridge, MA Boston Tea Stop – 54 JFK St, Cambridge, MA

– 54 JFK St, Cambridge, MA Bubble T Zone – 1082 Dorchester Ave, Dorchester, MA

– 1082 Dorchester Ave, Dorchester, MA WOW Bubble Tea – 4553 University Way NE, Seattle, WA

– 4553 University Way NE, Seattle, WA Ambrosia Cafe – 619 S King St, Seattle, WA

– 619 S King St, Seattle, WA Pearls Tea & Coffee – 4800 Delridge Way SW, Seattle, WA

– 4800 Delridge Way SW, Seattle, WA Drive Thru Boba & Ice Cream – 3727 Factoria Blvd, Bellevue, WA

– 3727 Factoria Blvd, Bellevue, WA Bubble Me – 238 Park Ln, Kirkland, WA

– 238 Park Ln, Kirkland, WA Gossip Espresso & Tea – 651 S King St, Seattle, WA

– 651 S King St, Seattle, WA Oasis Tea Zone – 519 6th Ave S, Seattle, WA and 4508 University Way NE, Seattle, WA

– 519 6th Ave S, Seattle, WA and 4508 University Way NE, Seattle, WA Bobachine – 1514 4th Ave, Seattle, WA

– 1514 4th Ave, Seattle, WA Ten Pou Bubble Tea – 10008 Aurora Ave N, Seattle, WA

– 10008 Aurora Ave N, Seattle, WA Teahouse Tapioca Tea – 2089 Westheimer Rd, Houston, Texas

– 2089 Westheimer Rd, Houston, Texas Tapioca House – 9104 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX

– 9104 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX Boba Zone – 10613 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX

– 10613 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX Juice Box – 9889 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX

– 9889 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX Jolly Cup Teahouse – 3006 Blalock Rd, Houston, TX

– 3006 Blalock Rd, Houston, TX Gelato Cup – 9889 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX

– 9889 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX Star Snow Ice & Teriyaki – 9889 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX

– 9889 Bellaire Blvd, Houston, TX Teacup Cafe – 8300 W Sam Houston Pkwy, Houston, TX

– 8300 W Sam Houston Pkwy, Houston, TX Shing Wang Bubble Tea Cafe – 237 Northeast 167th Street Miami, Florida – www.shingwangrestaurant.com/

Where to get it in Canada

Natural 9 Bubble Tea – 341 Spadina Ave, Toronto, ON M5T

– 341 Spadina Ave, Toronto, ON M5T Chatime – 132 Dundas St W, Toronto, ON M5G 1C3

– 132 Dundas St W, Toronto, ON M5G 1C3 Dream Tea House – they have three stores in Edmonton, Alberta – www.dreamtea.ca/locations.htm

– They have three stores in Edmonton, Alberta – www.dreamtea.ca/locations.htm Ten Ren Tea Company – 454 Dundas St W, Toronto, ON M5T 1G9

– 454 Dundas St W, Toronto, ON M5T 1G9 Real Fruit Bubble Tea – 660 Bloor St W, Toronto, ON M6G 1L2

– 660 Bloor St W, Toronto, ON M6G 1L2 E-Tea – 414 Dundas Street W, Toronto, ON M5T 1G6

– 414 Dundas Street W, Toronto, ON M5T 1G6 Not Just Noodles – 570 Yonge St, Toronto, ON M4Y 1Z3

– 570 Yonge St, Toronto, ON M4Y 1Z3 Yummy House – 234 Jones Ave, Toronto, ON M4M 3A6

– 234 Jones Ave, Toronto, ON M4M 3A6 Green Garden Bubble Tea Shop – 285 Spadina Ave, Toronto, ON M5T 1H1

– 285 Spadina Ave, Toronto, ON M5T 1H1 Vua Sandwiches – 1579 rue St-Denis, Montreal, QC H2X 3K3

– 1579 rue St-Denis, Montreal, QC H2X 3K3 BTea Lounge – 1875 Panama, Brossard, QC J4W 2S8

– 1875 Panama, Brossard, QC J4W 2S8 Sumo Ramen – 1007, Boul.Saint-Laurent, Montreal, QC H2Z 1J4

– 1007, Boul.Saint-Laurent, Montreal, QC H2Z 1J4 La Maison Thai 2 – 3780 Saint-Laurent Boul, Montreal, QC H2W 1X6

– 3780 Saint-Laurent Boul, Montreal, QC H2W 1X6 Magic Idea – 1675 Boulevard de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montreal, QC H3H 1J6

– 1675 Boulevard de Maisonneuve Ouest, Montreal, QC H3H 1J6 Pâtisserie Cocobun (Atwater) – Place Alexis Nihon – Metro Level, Montreal, QC H3Z 1X5

Where to get it in the UK

Bubbleology – with three locations in London – www.bubbleology.co.uk/find-us.php

– with three locations in London – www.bubbleology.co.uk/find-us.php Boba Jam – 102 Shaftesbury Avenue, London W1D 5EJ

– 102 Shaftesbury Avenue, London W1D 5EJ Chaboba – 8 East Yard, Camden Lock, London NW1 8AL

– 8 East Yard, Camden Lock, London NW1 8AL Candy Cafe – 3 Macclesfield St, London W1D 6AU

– 3 Macclesfield St, London W1D 6AU HK Diner – 22 Wardour Street, London W1D 6QQ

– 22 Wardour Street, London W1D 6QQ Aobaba – they have three locations in London and one in Dublin, Ireland – www.aobaba.com/places.html

– They have three locations in London and one in Dublin, Ireland – www.aobaba.com/places.html Milk Tea & Pearl – 12A Little Portland Street, London W1W 8BJ

– 12A Little Portland Street, London W1W 8BJ The Japanese Canteen – 14-16 Creechurch Lane, London EC3A 5AY

– 14-16 Creechurch Lane, London EC3A 5AY Cafe de Hong Kong – 47 Charing Cross Road, London WC2H 0AN

– 47 Charing Cross Road, London WC2H 0AN I Love BoBo Tea – Unit 2 Upper Mall, Arndale Centre, Manchester M4 3AQ – www.lovebobotea.co.uk

– Unit 2 Upper Mall, Arndale Centre, Manchester M4 3AQ – www.lovebobotea.co.uk Ho’s Bakery – 46 Faulkner Street, Manchester, M1 4FH – www.hosbakery.co.uk/

– 46 Faulkner Street, Manchester, M1 4FH – www.hosbakery.co.uk/ Moo-Cha Bubble Tea & Frozen Yoghurt – Bullring Shopping Centre, Middle East Mall, Birmingham, B5 4BE – www.moo-cha.com/index. php

– Bullring Shopping Centre, Middle East Shopping Centre, Birmingham, B5 4BE – www.moo-cha.com/index.php Caffe Chino – 70 Hurst St, Birmingham B5 4TD

– 70 Hurst St, Birmingham B5 4TD China Town Noodle – 2 Wrottesley Street, Birmingham B5 4RT

– 2 Wrottesley Street, Birmingham B5 4RT Bubble Tea – St John’s Centre, Leeds LS1 8EQ

– St John’s Centre, Leeds LS1 8EQ Ho’s Bakery – 115 Vicar Lane, Leeds LS1 6

– 115 Vicar Lane, Leeds LS1 6 Cafe de Pearl – 69 Bold Street Liverpool, Merseyside L1 4EZ

– 69 Bold Street Liverpool, Merseyside L1 4EZ Easy Way Tea – 140 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3DU

– 140 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3DU Cup Tea Bar – Mobile Bubble Tea Van/Truck serving Bristol, Bath and occasionally London (check link below for specific dates and locations) – www.cuppteabar.co.uk/

How to make bubble tea at home

If you don’t have a bubble tea bar or shop near you, you can make bubble tea at home. However, you will need access to an Asian market/grocer to find the ingredients for boba.

There is also a wide range of bubble tea ingredients and supplies available online, some of which I have listed on Amazon below to help you find the right bubble tea brewing supplies quickly and easily.

Finding and using the right tapioca balls/pearls is key to making the best bubble tea, which is explained in detail in the video below.

Prepare bubble tea with syrup

This video below shows you how to make bubble tea using syrup steeped in the tapioca pearls to give it a sweeter flavor. This is a great demonstration of how to make regular bubble tea, but with a little twist.

Foods That You CANT EAT With Braces

Foods That You CANT EAT With Braces
Foods That You CANT EAT With Braces


See some more details on the topic can i eat boba with braces here:

Can you drink boba milk tea with braces? – Reddit

Oh gosh… Very soft boba should be okay, but what a pain to clean. It will put you in high cavity risk. If it’s getting hard/chewy you …

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Source: www.reddit.com

Date Published: 10/7/2022

View: 5233

Can you eat boba with braces? – Instador

Yes, you can eat boba with braces, but please remember to brush and floss your teeth immediately because boba is sticky and will stick to the brackets and wires …

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Source: instador.com

Date Published: 11/5/2022

View: 2410

Can You Eat Boba With Braces? – Kylon Powell

Boba is normally sugar-free, and chewing it can help protect teeth from cavities by stimulating saliva production, which washes away any sugars …

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Source: kylonpowell.com

Date Published: 5/12/2022

View: 2232

Can You Have Boba With Braces – How To Discuss

You can think of tea, but I’ll be wary of tapioca beads. You don’t chew, your pieces can get stuck in the log between the anchors.

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Source: howtodiscuss.com

Date Published: 6/11/2021

View: 4498

Can You Eat Boba with Braces, Must Know About Harmful 2022

Many people ask can you chew boba with braces, the answer is no, you cant take chew boba with braces, chewy foods are not safe to eat with …

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Source: helpbraces.com

Date Published: 10/19/2021

View: 750

The Top 10 Foods and Drinks to Avoid With Braces

Foods and Drinks You Can Eat Freely with Braces · Bananas, melons and grapes · Yogurt, cheese and milk · Light crackers · Soft cookies · Mashed potatoes · Soup · Pasta …

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Source: speaksorthodontics.com

Date Published: 8/11/2022

View: 7240

Can you drink bubble tea with braces – Weebly

However, the list of things you can not eat and drink with braces is quite short, as long as you bite and chew carefully, you will find that you can still …

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Source: vezitiratad.weebly.com

Date Published: 11/13/2021

View: 228

Why You Definitely Need to Chew Your Boba or Else

Everyone has their own preferences, whether they prefer to swallow… or chew, how they prefer to eat/drink their boba is entirely up to them. However, as with any other type of food, it would certainly be far more beneficial to chew your tapioca balls.

This should really go without saying, but obviously there are still some of you out there that don’t get it, so let me say that again – yes, you should definitely chew your boba, it would be barbaric not to.

let me explain. As much as we all love our milk tea and boba, we should also be aware that it’s not exactly a healthy drink. Those sugary, chewy tapioca pearls that we just can’t get enough of are also very high in sugar; They were eventually boiled and then saturated with sugar. In fact, just a ¼ cup of these pearls can easily add 100 extra calories to your milk tea.

Additionally, these pearls are essentially carbohydrates with no minerals, vitamins, fiber, or basically anything that could actually benefit your health. So while the occasional boba tea is relatively harmless, this treat on a regular basis could have a negative impact, especially if you choose to simply swallow the boba tea rather than chew it first.

People out here really don’t chew boba… “I thought you just swallow them whole because it’s a drink”… Sir— — dope shit (@yungnagasaki) June 12, 2019

about to swallow boba without chewing ☺️ — julia ◡̈ (@jubjub216) June 17, 2019

WHO TF SWALLOWS BOBA WITHOUT CHEWING????? tf https://t.co/caHpuQ4sn5 — 💖💜💙 (@u4ic__) June 14, 2019

nobody: me, gulping boba beads straight up because I’m impatient: pic.twitter.com/CRuXkVRWJR – Hiro ˃̵ᴗ˂̵ (@VM95N) June 13, 2019

Firstly, generally speaking, if you don’t chew your food properly, your digestive system won’t be able to break it down, potentially leading to bloating, abdominal pain, and ultimately a slowdown in the overall digestive process. Even if you’re not funny, you could potentially choke on these balls.

Doctors also warned that the pearls in bubble tea, which are often made from starch, may also contain additives like thickeners and preservatives that are already difficult for the body to digest and break down. According to The Paper, excessive and continuous consumption of boba milk tea could lead to gastrointestinal upset.

Take, for example, this 14-year-old girl from China who was hospitalized after suffering from severe constipation for five days. After complaining about not being able to eat or moving her bowels and experiencing painful abdominal pain, the teen was found to have large amounts of undigested boba beads in her stomach after doctors ordered a CT scan.

This story should be a lesson for all of us, especially those who refuse to chew their boba. Hopefully the boba swallowing community will change their habits for the benefit of their own health and well-being. For those who don’t want to change, I hate being harsh, but even my dog ​​knows to chew their food, so should you.

Can You Drink Tea With Braces? — Orthodontic Specialists of White Plains

A common question in the orthodontic community is whether or not you should give up tea, coffee and other hot beverages or foods like soup. The short answer to that question is no, you don’t usually have to give up coffee, tea, or soup when you have braces. However, you must ensure that you take proper care of your orthodontic appliances. Whether you have Invisalign, ceramic braces, or traditional metal braces, there are things you can do to minimize the chance of damaging your braces and prevent tooth enamel staining.

Improve your oral hygiene

If you choose to stick with your normal diet and routine, you will need to change the way you care for your braces accordingly. For Invisalign wearers, you can get away with indulging in foods and beverages that aren’t typically recommended for consumption while wearing braces. This is because you can conveniently remove your Invisalign clear aligners before meals. Make sure you remove your splints before eating anything hot, as the heat from hot tea or a bowl of soup can warp the plastic, causing your aligners to not perform at their best. Brush before putting your trays back in and it’s that simple! For metal or ceramic braces, our orthodontists recommend using a straw whenever possible. Don’t have access to a straw? Make sure you rinse your mouth with water or mouthwash after consuming tea, coffee, red wine, or any other food or drink that can leave your teeth prone to staining. At the end of the day, the most successful orthodontic treatments are attributed to proper care and maintenance. Don’t forget to schedule your regular check-in appointments to ensure everything is working according to your orthodontist’s plan.

Call the While Plains Orthodontic Specialists office today for a complete list of foods and beverages to avoid while wearing braces. Our knowledgeable staff can answer all your questions.

Foods & Drinks to Avoid with Braces

At the Pacific Northwest Orthodontics Blog, we look at foods and drinks to avoid with braces. Once you start treatment with braces or Invisalign, it may take some time before you learn how to change your diet.

However, it will soon become part of the routine and you can still enjoy recipes you love. Plus, you can occasionally enjoy treats. Keep in mind that this is all temporary and will help you have a better experience.

By choosing foods wisely, you can avoid emergencies and keep your treatment on track. You’ll get the result you’ve always wanted, a beautiful, healthy smile, faster. Then you can reward yourself with all the favorites that you miss during the treatment.

See more about foods you can eat with braces here.

Simple checklist of foods and drinks to avoid with braces

There’s an easy way to determine foods and drinks to avoid with braces.

Think: Soft foods are safer.

Then ask if they fall into one of the following categories. If this is the case, try to avoid the item as it could damage or stain your braces. Hard, tough, sticky objects can get stuck around brackets and loosen them. On the other hand, staining items (we’ll get to that in a moment) can stain rubber bands and give your braces a discolored appearance.

Tough

Crisp

Difficult

coloring

Sticky

Sugary

As for the last category, avoiding too many sugary foods is always a good idea. With braces, it is more important to maintain oral hygiene and prevent tooth decay.

When you wear braces, it can be more difficult to properly clean the wires and brackets. Then a sugary film can feed bacteria that cause tooth decay. So try to limit sugary items, although it’s okay to indulge in the occasional treat and soft dessert.

Notably, some foods are hard until cooked. For example, hard vegetables like carrots are good when cooked in a softer form. Likewise, hard apples can be cut into small pieces or boiled. This way, you can still enjoy these foods with braces.

Also remember that soft foods can have sticky, chewy, crunchy and hard toppings. If this is the case, try to invalidate this as much as possible.

Sugary drinks to avoid with braces

Following, it’s a good idea to limit sugary or acidic drinks like these:

Acidic liquids (including distilled water and some bottled spring water)

energy drinks

water with taste

fruit drinks

Sodas (including diet)

sports drinks

It’s not always possible to be picky about drinking water, and drinking water is usually the healthiest option in general. However, some brands of bottled water may not be as acidic as others. When in doubt, opt to stay hydrated with whatever is available.

Coloring of food and drinks

If you wear braces, you may have elastic bands that tend to stain some foods and drinks. With clear braces, they tend to resist stains. However, it is always a good choice to limit these items. Then brush, floss and rinse if you stain food and drink.

balsamic vinegar

Beer

beets

Berry

Coffee

currants

curry

food coloring

grape juice

Mustard

red wine

soy sauce

tea

tomatoes

Remarkably, this is not a complete list. So if an item is likely to soil your clothes, it can also soil your rubber bands. Luckily we will change your rubber bands at your next appointment. Then you can choose new colors if you want. In general, darker colored rubber bands will appear less discolored than clear or lighter shades.

Foods to limit right after braces

In the days after you get your braces, your mouth will be more sensitive for a while. Therefore, you should avoid the following foods until you get used to them (usually a few weeks).

citrus fruits and spicy foods

Thick bread and pieces of meat

Ice (if sensitive to cold)

limit ice cream? Well, not everyone is sensitive to the cold. Some people like ice cream to reduce swelling after getting braces.

We hope this information on foods and drinks to avoid with braces is helpful. While it sounds like a lot to remember, ask yourself if an item is hard, chewy, sticky, or crunchy. If you then suspect it might damage your braces, try choosing something softer instead.

Don’t forget: soon your discipline and hard work will be rewarded with a beautiful smile that you can show for a lifetime.

Learn more about living with braces here.

Have questions? Call us at (253) 472-7788.

Since 1994, we are proud to have provided outstanding orthodontic care to patients of all ages, including children, teens and adults in Tacoma, Parkland, Lakewood, Ficrest, University Place, Puyallup, Joint Base Lewis-McChord and the greater Pierce County.

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